A Ruthless Determination

Ruthless Determination

“A ruthless determination is all well and good, yet without the proper resources, all we’re left with, is ruthless self-destruction”

Frustration and confusion can often be the end result of our strength and determination when this is in conflict. For example, we may have a strong determination to succeed and change our situation, but no matter our efforts, all we succeed at, is failure. Believe it or not, there can exist a part of the mind, that has a ruthless determination to fail. Imagine a mind with unequal determination, between success and failure, that has become tipped toward the latter.

A conflict of this nature can be down to something as a simple learning we experience when young. It could have been a very important event, let’s say a sports event, that we failed at aged five. So important was this event, in the mind of the five year old, that failure was soul destroying. The reaction from parents, teachers and siblings only compounded this failure. Such an individual, may go on to show great promise, but always end up falling at the starting line. The same nervousness, experienced aged five, can still be felt aged forty five!

“The feeling of nervousness associated with events when young can stay with us all our lives”

Now imagine the same sports event but with a completely different outcome. Instead of humiliation, disappointment and guilt, there was the exhilaration of running over the finish line coming first. It’s these kind of experiences that make the difference between winning and losing. They often become a continuing theme throughout the whole of our lives. We come to believe we’re winners or losers respectively.

“Even when winning, if we’re filtering our successes through the belief we always fail, we’ll not be recognising our greatness”

The good news is, through the unique nature of workshops run by The Freedman College, we’re able to question the relevance of such experiences now we’re grown. We’re also able to question the appropriateness of the reactions from the adults around us at that time. As such, not only are we able to remove the limiting beliefs borne from our negative experiences, we become better parents too.

The resources are now here and we’re ready to share them with you. Contact Us.   

The Competition for Power

The Competition for Power

The Competition for Power

How do we gain power? What is power? Is there a difference between personal power and power over others? Why do we need any kind of power?

All interesting questions. As a lead in, let’s start, on a slight tangent, by talking about what I like to call the so-answer-response. The so-answer-response can be given in reply to any question. The answer always starts with the word ‘so’ and goes like this:

Q, What are you doing?

A, So . . .  today we’re discussing power  

As I see it, this rather modern and obviously highly contagious precursor to answering a question, is in fact, all about power.

“It would seem, modern day language, has developed to the point, even answering a direct question, is seen as some kind of power struggle”

It’s like this. If I’m asked a question, and I then choose to answer it with a direct response, directly related to the question, I’m seen to be giving away my power. Linguistics has seen a way around this problem, through adding the ‘so’ precursor, to the answer. Consider the difference:

Q, What are you doing?

A, I’m discussing power.

Can you sense the difference here? Slight isn’t it?

The point being, we’re all in some kind of power struggle. Be this something that’s obvious, or something that’s not quite so, the power struggle goes on. If we were able to observe children at play, we would see the early signs, of the kind of power struggles humans go on to play, everyday of their lives. We might now ask: Why? Why do we need these power struggles?

Now, rather than answering that question directly, I’ll proceed by asking a few more. Why are people being poisoned on our streets? Why are nearly two million people – in the UK alone – experiencing the trauma of domestic abuse every year. Why, somewhere in the world right now, are there innocent women and children being bombed? What is this kind of power struggle? What is the real problem here?

“Allow me to give you a further, if gentler example, of a power struggle”

Just yesterday I took a drive out in my car. During the drive I had an altercation with a professional (van) driver, who thought I’d dangerously cut him up, when entering a roundabout. There was no collision and no brakes were applied, yet the angry driver insisted on pulling up alongside me, in order to scream and rant about my poor driving. His parting shot was a beauty: “You shouldn’t be on the fucking roads mate!” The fact, he was the professional driver, losing his temper, is perhaps besides the point.

It is only matter of opinion anyway. ‘Making good progress’ is how, as a qualified advanced driver, I would have termed my particular driving style. Safe driving, is making good progress, whilst at the same time, avoiding causing other drivers to change speed or direction. This was my driving style. The van driver had other concerns though. His real concern was this: I’d taken his power.

The section of road he saw in front of him was his and his alone, so for me, to safely and keenly ‘beat him to it,’ as it were, annoyed and frightened him. I took his power, and no human likes that. The alternative, is a calm driver – who manages to stay calm in similar circumstances – through seeing the road, as belonging to all of us. If someone safely beats us to it, then good luck to them.

“This opinion is gained through experience and of course recognition that power over others is but an illusion”

I may seem to have gone of the point slightly, however, the subtle shifts in power, through the games humans play, can, when we look at them objectively, seem a little petty. I suppose my gentle examples, given above, have been intended as a means of highlighting this.

And so, what exactly do we have to gain, through road rage or indeed through the murder, and/or abuse of others? Ultimately we gain nothing except the fleeting illusion that we’ve somehow gained the upper hand. It links closely with the game of one-up-man-ship discussed in an earlier post.  

“I believe the Greeks very cleverly understood the competitive nature of humans, and looked to channel this, through their creation of the Olympic games”

Channelling competitiveness – and the human need for power over each other – is using this often ugly trait (to some) in a positive way.

So why do we need this power over others? Well here’s the thing: analysing that need, is pointless. There is nothing to gain from understanding a trait that’s ugly when directionless, yet we do gain immensely, when we understand how the need to dominate each other, can be channelled.

Even when given channelled-direction, and to the detriment of the Greeks and their creation of this, there are those whose need for dominance holds no bounds. You see, not everyone, plays fair. Oh no.

“Potentially, and in this instance, analysing why is useful”

It’s simple, not everyone plays fair because losing adds further damage to their weakness of character. Those who can’t stand to lose, will do all in their power to ensure they don’t, and this includes, cheating. What the cheat is failing to see is, they will always, be exposed.

Exposure fulfils a fear they can’t cope with: losing. They can’t cope with giving a little of their power away. In the end the cheat always loses. Fears are self fulfilling. This is a very important understanding to gain, if you’re playing to win, simply because you can’t stand to lose.

“It is said, it’s not the winning that matters, it’s the taking part that counts”

Even this has been dismissed as something ‘only a loser would say.’ Such is the competitive nature of ‘winners.’ Far better to teach a child: when you win, do this with humility and grace, and you’ll grow to be a good man. And if you lose, respect the greater skill of the man who wins.

Respect – from a man who loses – is only gained when winning is done through giving the proper merit and consideration for fellow competitors; in whatever this may be. We must be aware, if it wasn’t for those who gracefully give some of their power to the winners, the games would simply cease. Where’s the fun in that?

Winning and losing can potentially be seen in equal measure if we recognise that competition must be kept healthy. It’s the only way we’ll  make it as a species. Learn to make good progress with safety.

loveliness

Floating on a Cloud of Loveliness

“It’s true to say, we really do create our own world. When all is well in our internal world all is well out there too.”

Cut out all the negativity, gain healthy perspective, find stability and balance, focus on ourselves; what makes us happy, and we’ve cracked it. Life just couldn’t get any more rosy, so beautiful in fact, we feel like we’re floating on a cloud of loveliness.

The main problem with this, is there’s often that gnawing, nagging feeling, that the reality for many, is far removed from our own little world of loveliness. Empathy, for the suffering of others, often gets in the way of our perfect little world. Perhaps if we were blind and deaf we’d have a better chance of cutting out all the horrors of the world. Then again, blindness and deafness would carry its own level of suffering, for the afflicted, would it not?

And with that said, we seem to think it’s okay to keep a child alive who can’t breath or swallow, or do pretty much anything for itself really. Or is that perhaps the whole point: to keep a defenceless lump of flesh, totally dependent on us, its entire life. A bit like keeping a pet, is it not? Do we not think there’s any level of suffering when we stuff tubes up the noses and down the throats of babies? Humans have kept other humans as slaves, for their whim and self-centered purposes, for thousands of years. Seems we’ve not understood that yet.

Now hold on though, let’s get back to that perfect little world, floating on a cloud of loveliness, let’s put aside our empathy and ability to wonder about all the inequality there is in the world. We can for a while, until someone throws acid in our face, that is. Then we wonder what the point is. We wonder why we strive to make things better for ourselves and others, when a damaged child thinks he can gain satisfaction for his wants, by throwing acid in someone’s face.

“So full of rage and hatred is he – as a consequence of his upbringing – that he can destroy someone’s life in such a way, in the time it takes to click finger and thumb; over.”

Worse than murder, and we don’t know how to punish them, or put it right, do we? Although, we do know, don’t we? If we really put our minds to it, we can see the subsection of society, that never learned the lessons of empathy; of responsibility, and how to change from a child to an adult. We can see it clearly. What are we to do about it? Carry on regardless and place ourselves back on the floaty cloud of loveliness?

Perhaps what we lack is strong leaders we can believe in. Leaders who know that keeping a terminally sick human alive is causing such vile, detestable suffering, that it has absolutely nothing to do with love and everything to do with fear. Leaders who see the ignorance we’re trapped within. Leaders who see the ground we yet need to cover so we can better get along. Leaders who love.

Leaders who love understand the human animal and his mind.

To reach the top of the food chain, wipe-out so much wildlife – because we need the space, the food or both – to conquer so much, in so many ways, takes an extraordinary lifeform. Good or bad, it’s what humans have done, and this may only be a process, after all, we do live in a very violent, if beautiful, universe.

Are we not just a product of this violence? Of course we are. That doesn’t mean we can’t evolve to become better, more loving and greater then the sum total of our parts though, does it? All it takes is an awareness that we refuse to simply ignore. We can keep one eye on our own little world, whilst keeping the other, on the quality of life for others. It’s awareness that enlightens.

“It’s okay to be aware of the nature of the human animal. Aware of how fear keeps us trapped. The subsection of society, that seems unable to think beyond the trap of their self-perpetuating ignorance, needs to be taken out of the shadows.”

It’s simply no good thinking we can punish them out of ignorance, only education can do this. For example, the acid throwing child in north east London this week. What happened to this child for him to become so full of rage and hatred; to have such disregard for fellow man? Was it the type of education he received that did the damage, he then passed on to another, through a bottle of acid? Was it an education – of how to remain ignorant and fearful, believing in lack; believing life is about taking, never giving back – that damaged him? What say we start to educate our children to believe they’re already full? What say we educate our children in love?

We can, through example, example, example. Show the child how to live a beautiful life and he will strive for this himself. Show the child a loving, stable, family environment, and he will strive to emulate this himself. When will we see: children really need nothing more.

family

A Basic Human Right

Human Brain

“It’s said, one of our fundamental, basic human rights, is that of procreation. We have the right, as human beings, to conceive new life. It’s fundamental to our entire makeup, all of us adults, have the right, to have a child.”

It stands to reason doesn’t it? We are life, therefore, we have the right to create life. By association, we then have the right to mold this new life, in whatever way we see fit. It’s this association we must take issue with.

We must take issue: because we have the basic human right to create new life, we then have the right to make assumptions. To assume this new life has no influence in deciding how it’s raised. How can we simply assume that we have the right to raise a child, in whatever way we see fit? To do this even if we’re ignorant as to whether this is in the best interests of that child or not.

Of course who decides what is in fact ‘the best interests of the child’ raises more questions than answers. We do place governments in such a position that they hold most of the cards in this regard. Yet most governments – because of their fear of losing power – are no doubt often reluctant to interfere.

We do have social controls in place. Those who work within this field, are authorised to intervene in the most extreme cases. They must intervene when the best interests of the child are being completely ignored, and/or perhaps even abused. However, their intervention is often too little, too late, and therefore ineffective.

“So what about making the case for children’s rights before they’re even born, or better still, conceived?”

Perhaps we can play with the idea of having fewer people in the world. Would this improve things for children and their rights? What about China? Although the intention, was not to defend the rights of the unborn, but to protect the wellbeing of the living, Communist China, and its one child policy, is perhaps a good example. Do children in small families have greater rights?

China is now facing fears of economic disaster in its near future. There are too few youngsters to pay for an ageing population. When we look at the quality of life for the child – who has no siblings and as such is the sole centre of attention – has the one child policy been beneficial to China’s children?

“Interestingly, and much to the dismay of China’s leaders, even though this policy has now been abandoned. Many young couples are staying with the idea of only having one child. It has now become enmeshed into their culture.”

With all this said, even when a family is small, there is no guarantee of this improving quality of life, or asserting and improving the rights of the child. In fact it could make matters worse. Often siblings prove to be the providers/protectors of brothers and sisters, and as such, larger families do have their benefits. And let’s never forget the issue of loneliness.

Back to the point in question: who is protecting the rights of the unborn? What is it exactly that gives parents the right to bring life into a world that many consider broken and overpopulated?

Having children is certainly one of the most selfish activities there is, this is not to say there’s anything wrong with selfishness, there isn’t. The problem, is when selfishness, is mixed with ignorance.

“What would it take for potential parents to realise that the child, they’re asking to bring into the world, is not actually asking to be born?”

They may just as easily be asking to not be conceived. It may well be, that once the child’s consciousness is sufficiently developed, it would much prefer to have never been born; ever increasing suicide rates no doubt the solution.

And so, along with reducing suicide rates and protecting the rights of children, what would it take for humans to make this world – and its people – a more welcoming and pleasant place?

Surely potential parents should be asking themselves: “do we really want to bring a new life into this world that we’ve turned into a hell?” Why are parents so decided on bringing new life into this hell only to perpetuate its existence? Surely any parent would want to bring a child into a heaven, rather than a hell?

The answer, for most, is of course family. We create a little slice of heaven with our families don’t we? We exclude and negate the existence of the hell all around us, by creating the warm bosom of family. When we have family, we can find a little peace of heavenly-safety, longingly returned to each day. Something that’s way and above the depths of this hell we’ve created.

“Thank goodness for family you might say. And as long as we continue to place psychopaths in charge of this hell, then hell – outside our small family units – is all we’ll get.”

This does bring me back to something I’ve mentioned in the past: The Global Family. We know immigration doesn’t work – it will never take over five billion humans out of poverty – and so what is the answer to creating the ease and safety, a Global Family, is likely to create?

blackboard8

The answer is a common understanding of the most fundamental concept to human survival: LOVE. Surely love, and a clean understanding of this, is the first basic, human right to be sought and guaranteed. Consider this definition:

“Love and the ability to teach it, is wanting and needing to empower your partner and children to evolve into whole human beings who are free of fear, because that process gives you pleasure, freedom from your own fear, and brings you closer to wholeness”      Create Beautiful Partnerships

This definition of love, takes into account the natural tendency toward human selfishness. Indeed it uses this very tendency in a positive way. And what if, rather than simply stating: partners and children, we also include – all those we meet – into the definition? 

If we loved all those we meet, in the manner described above, this world would certainly be a better place. Irrespective of the size of our family, this could be achieved in a very short space of time.

“Removing fear will prove to be the most effective means of controlling the levels of our population.”

So there we are: putting the world to rights before we have children. This includes a common understanding of love, the removal of fear and effective leadership from well reasoned people. Not to much to ask for now, is it?

the key is parents who teach empathy

Where’s The Fun in That?

Golden key and puzzle

You’re crouched behind a low wall, your heart is beating fast, you’re anxious, you’re scared you have a rifle in your hands, the gun is sighted, you pull the trigger. Bang! He’s dead. So where’s the fun in that?

The plan is laid, the bomb is strapped around your torso. Now walking, as calmly as you possibly can, headed to the crowded market. You pick your moment, you’re sweating profusely, yet you know this is the only way. Bang! You’re dead.  So where’s the fun in that?

You’ve had a drink too many, you’re feeling happy, he’s asked you back to his room. You’re having sex it’s exciting, you’re drunk, and now his friend is at it too. Bang! You’re mind is dead. So where’s the fun in that?

“Whether it be shooting at your enemies, choosing martyrdom, from the self-detonated bomb, or having exciting sex taken much too far, we’re all able to find a way to make a complete mess of our own little world, aren’t we?”

You might wonder what it is that compels us humans to be so damned self-destructive. It’s not as if we plan it this way is it? The plan is usually survival of one form or another. A belief in the afterlife, one much better than this, is obviously very appealing when you live in abject misery. Especially when the corrupted teachers of hate and fear get hold of your mind when young. What underdeveloped countries lack is all too obvious: good leadership.

And what about the night out turned sour? Or playing war games with real guns and bombs, ships and tanks? We didn’t plan on getting raped. We didn’t plan on getting shot or being the shooter, destroying our lives with the guilt and shame of taking life.

Looked at from afar, we can see the games we play as simply that: games that have gone too far. Games where the rules of proper sportsmanship have become confused and overly complicated. Games of fear that we play out in reality making our lives, and that of others, a hellish misery.

When young, if we’re lucky, we’re asked to ‘play nicely.’ To play our games in a way that is controlled and based on simple rules. We’re asked by our parents: “if you hit Johnny like that, how do you imagine he feels?” We’re asked to be gentle and loving, we’re shown how to play nicely. We’re taught empathy. It’s as if we’re lacking these lessons in how to think. It’s as if we’re missing the lessons of how to love and build compassion for our fellow man.

How do the people left behind feel when you blow yourself up? How do the loved ones, of the man you’ve just shot, feel, when picking up the pieces of your violent act? If you take this woman when she’s drunk – with little control over her mind – how will she feel in the morning? Will you feel like a man or a coward? Would you feel ashamed? A real, courageous, strong man, doesn’t overpower a woman, to get what he needs, he respects her needs first. Where have all these men gone? Where are all the gentle-men?

“Truly courageous men and women don’t take up the gun or the bomb in the belief it will get the job done. True courage is displayed by those who seek, the more challenging and difficult job, of finding peaceful solutions. Where have all the peace-keepers gone?”

We can carry on failing and flailing, in an unthinking way, or we can plan to succeed. We succeed, not through destruction, but by the construction of loving bonds and lasting resolutions to the lazy solution of fuelling violence, anger and hatred. It starts with understanding how we fail. We fail through failing to plan with empathy and love for each other in our hearts. We fail by failing to plan.

blackboard6

When it comes to planning, and specifically how we plan on finding the correct people to lead us, it’s seems we’ve still to learn from our mistakes. We humans, don’t necessarily always learn from our mistakes, only sometimes.

So what about leadership? Those who are drawn to politics are not necessarily the correct calibre of people to lead us. We need a rethink. At the end of the day, it’s us that’re electing people who border on – or are completely full blown – psychopaths. Loving, powerful leaders with the skill of empathy, are rare, how do we find them? We find them in their childhood.

We must teach our children empathy and how to be effective leaders in their childhood. Only then will we have a pool of potentials, who, as adults, can lead us all on to greatness. Sound crazy? Think about it. We really do need a rethink, or perhaps just a reminder, of how and why certain leaders, from our distant past, became so great.

the cure to madness

Why the World is Mad

Connected lines background

It’s all about links and connections. Think about how one thought leads to another.

You wake in the morning and your mind starts to whir. What exactly decides the thoughts that lead from one to another?  What is it exactly that determines our very thought processes? Why do we think what we do? Why do we think the way we do?

“One thought always leads to another and it’s this very process that determines our seeming sanity and rationality.”

If our thoughts were completely random without any obvious links and connections then confusion would be the result. This confusion would potentially only reside within the minds of others, rather than within the mind of the random thinkers themselves. Random thoughts – within the confused mind – do not seem random, they may well seem correct, and normal. The insane are unaware of their insanity.

Thankfully, the majority of us have thoughts that link in a logical, sequential and rational manner. Incidentally actively promoting non-logical, lateral thinking can be useful at times, but that’s for another post. Now, the easiest way to understand how thoughts and thinking are organised and directed within the mind, is to think of the human brain as a kind of map. We can call these maps: Belief Systems.

With this now established, let’s consider someone with an important mind: a world leader. We can easily map out the sequential thoughts (beliefs) of our example leader; we can do this linguistically, like this:

leader = power = ownership = home = control = strength = fear = military = protection = aggression = growth = defence = anger = hate = resentment = prejudice

“We can safely say these thoughts would go around in a looped fashion, and these few words may only be part of a sequence of many hundreds.”

Now, consider a different leader whose sequential thoughts (beliefs) include these:

leader = direction = love = home = growth = teacher = strength to others = giving = education = prosperity = freedom = compassion = empathy = equality

Take a moment to ponder on these beliefs and decide which list would best suit a good world leader. Hopefully you’ve chosen the second set, and will of course by now noticed a problem: Not all leaders have the second set of beliefs mapped within the neurons of their minds. Not all world leaders think the same way.

“Certainly if our motivation is of a positive nature i.e we’re accepting of the inevitable pain life may hold for us; driven by love to find what we want – rather than fear, to avoid what we don’t want – all will be well.”

However, if we’re negatively driven (avoidance) then it’s more likely our minds will hold beliefs similar in nature to the sequence in our first example. So to put it simply, the beliefs we choose, will always be influenced by what we were shown or taught, to be effective motivators.

In order to build your understanding a little more, let me give you a further example. Consider the schoolboy experiencing bullying. On reporting his troubles he’s told: ‘the best way to get rid of a bully is to punch him fairly and squarely on the nose and to do this so hard he doesn’t get up for more.’

Now, what beliefs, do you imagine, are likely to form in our schoolboys mind? Is he likely to grow up offensive, defensive or in fact neither of the two? Bear in mind, the outcome of punching his tormentors on the nose, would certainly be a decider. If the bullies backed off, this would affirm the advice, yet if the bullies just came back for more, this would cause confusion, creating a different set of beliefs, that would possibly be confused and nonlinear in nature.

Far better to advise our tormented schoolboy: bullies are simply people who believe in using violence, as a means of defending themselves against what they fear, and the best way to tackle this will never be with further aggression.

“The best means of helping the bully is to love him. We do this through educating him with something other than our fists, guns, tanks, bombs or whatever.”

blackboard4

The overall point to gain is this: confusion is our madness. When there’s little continuity in the beliefs and understandings of our leaders, confusion is the result. World leaders (or potential ones) all have their own agendas driven by their own values, motivations and beliefs. Therefore we’re all being kept in a constant state of confusion.

The prognosis, unfortunately, isn’t good. Until we have a universal understanding (in the minds of the people who are drawn toward leadership) of what it means to be a good, effective and powerful leader, the madness will continue.

Perhaps the answer is to find one leader, who holds the correct attributes – beliefs and all – whose teachings can then be used to govern the entire world. Of course who this person is and on what authority he’d be elected, remains to be seen.

What a crazy idea though, total madness, wouldn’t you say?

Ruthless Determination

The Simple Formula of Powerful Leadership

Leadership. Audio version here

Leadership
Leadership

If you’re a bit of a reader (likely as you’re reading this) then I’ll start by recommending a good book.

jack-sparks

Even if you’re not necessary into the genre, it’s worth having a go at, as you’ll easily be able to see the metaphor behind the story – I’ll leave you with it, and share no more, or be at risk of spoiling it for you.

“When it comes to leadership, there’s certainly a very fine balance to be struck. Amongst many things, this includes the necessary balance between giving the people what they want and getting what it is, you want. This last sentence holds the key element to powerful leadership: what you want.”

What exactly do you want? Immediately, you may think I’m going to get all righteous and noble and say: leadership has nothing to do with what you want. This would be incorrect and I would go as far as to say: powerful, effective leadership, has everything to do with what you want.

Let’s paint a picture of the ideal. In the ideal picture what you actually want, and is therefore your motivation, is a beautiful life. Of course what your definition, or beliefs, of what ingredients are needed to form a beautiful life, will be important. If having a beautiful life for you, includes the experience of seeing  disharmony, suffering and hardship, amongst those you lead, then we have a problem. So obviously, good leadership, includes such things as compassion, empathy and so on.

Now, coming back to what you want (a beautiful life), a further important ingredient, is the understanding that a beautiful life is only ever achieved, when we see others experiencing it. For example, the best cooks are the ones who gain enormous amounts of pleasure, witnessing people eating and enjoying their beautifully prepared food – I have a great deal of respect for a good cook.

“Perhaps we could gain an important insight here in terms of identifying whether or not you have the most suited character traits for good leadership i.e does observing happy, joyous people, give you a sense of satisfaction? Are the policies you’re likely to implement going to enhance the lives of the people you lead? All important questions.”

Good leadership no doubt includes good, healthy internal drivings. Consider a leader who blindly pursues self-centered agendas that are based on playing to deep seated anger and resentment. This deep seated anger and resentment will of course reside within the leader themselves, and yet, the goal of power is to play to this within the people. In other words we have a negative as the driver.

Changing this around is to have a positive as the driver. Perhaps to talk about union, togetherness, prosperity within individuals, rather than segregation.

“To be able to promote individuality at the same time as togetherness is to empower each and everyone of the people you lead.”

This is achieved through appealing, not to deep seated anger and resentment, but to the freedom of movement love of the self, promotes.

The example of Scottish independence is a good one, as the current SNP agenda, is loosely based on the negative, historical continuity, of a hatred between the Scottish and the English. People will be reluctant and restrained from moving on when they continue to see, and are given value, in remaining stuck in the past.

“The amount of companies, for example, that still manage their staff through using authoritarian fear, instilled in childhood, never ceases to amaze me.”

Manage through the belief, that all your staff have the best interest of the company at heart and have emotional intelligence – or at the very least the potential to gain this – and you’ll be on the right track. This is done through education.

So there we are, a snippet to help us understand the what and who of powerful leadership. Your internal map holds the key. The ability to listen to good advice is also important.